Wine Review: 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon by Altue, Chile

Tonight’s occasion: 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon by Altue, Chile.

We are truly living in a golden age for wines in general. I am sitting here contemplating the finer points of a great little wine from lesser known corner of the world in Chile and thinking to myself, not only is the wine well made, it is one hell of a steal. Mere decades ago, such a moment would have been highly unlikely.

Pleasant nose with plum, cherry, oak, earth, and at least one other floral note that combines to create a subtle butterscotch twist (for lack of a better descriptor). Once opened I detect a hint of minerality. This all carries forward into a mild mannered body with oak and vanilla more pronounced and fruit diminished. Minerality carries forward to the body as well. The body is light and understated for a Cabernet Sauvignon. None too acidic. It reads like a big California Pinot Noir. After about an hour the body develops a noticeable buttery caramel character. The finish is graceful and quickly fades away with a suggestion of tannin. Once opened, the cherry is more pronounced in the finish.

Overall this is a smooth wine. I love noticing the terroir in a wine. This tells me that little has been done to the wine in the way of altering its expression. It is an honest wine. Approachable. It is not overly complex. At 13% ABV it is also not a laborious, exhausting affair either. You can open a bottle and slowly follow it through your evening without suffering from palate fatigue. This is a fantastic EDC wine (EDC = Every Day Consumption). For the price Casemates Wine is offering it presents great value for the price. This is a great way to stock up your cellar.

Wine Review: 2013 La Stupenda, Barbera by Peterson

Tonight’s occasion: 2013 La Stupenda, Barbera by Peterson, Mendocino, California. Courtesy of Casemates who invited me to review tonight’s offering. I am writing this as I begin my review. My initial impressions right out of the bottle are very dark and inky for a Barbera. Barbera typically run on the lighter, ruby side of the spectrum like a classic Sangiovese or Pinot Noir. The twist-off held a very tight seal all these years and despite its journey. Making the first pour I got hit with big spice and a hint of raisin. I typically don’t care for raisin in my wines however I am pleased to confirm this rapidly dissipated. This tells me the wine is very much alive.

I was met with a medium-to-big nose, full of subtle oak, hint of berry and at least another floral note I cannot pinpoint (lavender comes to mind, not sure why), perhaps you can help me here. A hint of minerality come through after a few hours. The attack is fairly fruit forward but restrained. Up front, as with most Barbera, the body comes with noticeable spice and acidity which easily gives way once your palate adjusts after a few sips.

After about 15 minutes the body quickly becomes buttery smooth, adding the faintest hint of caramel into the mix. The finish, without doubt is a big one, starting out hot and spicy and as it opens, develops more tannic grip albeit restrained. This is by any account a big Barbera especially at 13.9% ABV. For a single VARIETAL Barbera, it is surprisingly layered, complex and balanced. A testament to the winemaker’s craft. I can appreciate its richer tone as I feel in this case it balances out the acidity typical of the varietal. Once opened up the acidity is quickly tempered by a creamy buttery expression.

This wine shows great maturity. This Barbera is well built. It commands your attention. It is aging much more gracefully than a typical Barbera. I feel like it’s time is now. It’s a somewhat different take on Barbera from a region off the beaten path that has had time and patience to fully develop. I think it presents a tremendous value. Please visit Casemates to take advantage of this deal before it’s gone. Fred and Jamie Peterson, after twirling it for a couple hours now, I like it! Estupenda!!!

How to stock your Wine Cellar – Casemates

Ladies and Gentlemen. Today I’d like to present to you, Casemates.com. I often get comments about how my wine enthusiasm must be expensive to maintain. Well the truth is, it really isn’t that expensive. One of the main reasons for starting this blog is to show you and any aspiring winesnob that your love for wine does not necessarily have to be an expensive one. You do not have to spend a lot of money to enjoy good, great and sometimes exceptional wines.

Enter Casemates. They play no small part in my overall cellar strategy. This group dates back to mid 2000s. I discovered them when they ran Wine Woot and very quickly came to rely on them for great wines at great prices and sometimes ridiculous bargains. They now play a key role in stocking my cellar with great EDC (Every Day Consuption) wines. While the wine deals they feature are often inexpensive, this is no indication of their quality. It is not uncommon to find deals ranging between $80-$180 per case. Some of these wines have stood shoulder-to-shoulder with wines in my reserve that are 3-5 times the price. There are few things sweeter to a winesnob than opening a bottle with friends and watch their surprise when hear how little it cost. We are truly living at a great time when great wines are well within reach and Casemates is playing a key role in that respect.

Moving forward I will try to highlight deals on wines I am familiar with. If you have any questions or would like my feedback on any of their offerings, please feel free to reach out to me on Instagram (@winesnob.blog). You can also follow Casemates on Instagram (@casemateswine).

This post is not sponsored in any way by Casemates. As with all my content, it is a pure reflection of my personal experience, opinion and my desire to support those who’s work I appreciate.